Research update: March 2015

Could it be? Has spring finally sprung in Chicago? In the beginning of March it seemed like winter might hang on forever, but as the month went on, the weather started to turn and there are now even a few little flowers in bloom around Chicago. This is an exciting time for any botanist because it means that very soon, there will be all kinds of leaves, stems, flowers and fruits for us to enjoy.

I'm continuing to work on my DNA paternity analyses. This is still going to take many more months before I have collected all the data I need.

I’m continuing to work on my DNA paternity analyses. This is still going to take many more months before I have collected all the data I need.

There were signs of life for my indoor work too. I’ve been continuing my lab work for the paternity tests that I’m doing, which is tedious but moving along. The seeds that I’ve had in the incubator all winter are starting to germinate, or wake up from their winter dormant period and grow. You can see from my picture that they’re not very big yet, but over the next couple of weeks they’ll gradually get bigger and bigger until they have enough tissue for me to extract their DNA and hopefully determine which plant was each seed’s father. This will involve a lot more time in the lab (months and months) but it’s nice to know that at least this part of my experiment is heading in the right direction.

My seeds have germinated and are starting to grow now that they're in the warmer incubator.

My seeds have germinated and are starting to grow now that they’re in the warmer incubator.

It was exciting to attend the Climate Change Conference at Loyola University

It was exciting to attend the Climate Change Conference at Loyola University

In March, my research also took me in a couple unique directions. The class I was helping to teach came to an end and I completed the course in population genetics that I was taking, so I had a little time to get away from my home campus. This allowed me to attend the Climate Change Conference that was held at the Institute for Environmental Sustainability at Loyola University. The speakers were very interesting and my favorite part was learning about how some universities are choosing not to invest their money in companies (for example oil companies) that harm the environment. As a botanist and someone who cares about plants and the environment, this “divestment” (taking money out of an investment and putting it somewhere else) seems like a good idea although it can be tricky.

In March I traveled to Guatemala to talk to tenth grade students about the environmental benefits of green roofs.

In March I traveled to Guatemala to talk to tenth grade students about the environmental benefits of green roofs.

In addition to this local conference, my research took me far away to Guatemala, where I gave a presentation to 10th grade students about the environmental benefits of plants on green roofs. As a culminating activity, all the students had to design their own green roof. I can tell you, there were some very unique designs that included potato plants, compost, sunbathing areas and even hen houses. It makes me excited that young students are so creative and are able to think outside the box when it comes to making cities greener, more environmentally-friendly places that incorporate more plants. I think there may have been some future botanists in the group!

And as the month closes, I’m now on my way to Pittsburgh for some more presentations, so be sure to come back and read my April update.

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