Research update: April 2015

Welcome spring – I think it’s finally here to stay!

April was a good month and things are finally starting to look a little more exciting up on the green roofs. For a botanist, “exciting” means that the plants are back!

The experimental seeds in the incubator are getting bigger!

The experimental seeds in the incubator are getting bigger!

My little germinating seeds in the incubator are beginning to grow up a bit. But even more exciting is that after a long winter (well, a typical winter – but in Chicago this always tends to feel a bit long), I am happy to report that many of the prairie plants that I planted on the green roofs last year or the year before are coming back. A lot of the species seemed to have made it through the winter and are starting to pop up through the surface of the rocky green roof soil. Among the dried leaves from last year are little bits of green – exciting to see!

The prairie plants are starting to grow again on the green roofs!

The prairie plants are starting to grow again on the green roofs!

Blades of a grass called "little bluestem" are starting to emerge around last year's dried up leaves.

Blades of a grass called “little bluestem” are starting to emerge around last year’s dried up leaves.

 

The winter data from the temperature probes has been recorded and they're ready to record data all summer long.

The winter data from the temperature probes has been recorded and they’re ready to record data all summer long.

It’s still a bit too early in the year to start taking measurements of the plants (that task will start next month) but I was able to find all the temperature probes that I buried in the fall. I dug them up, downloaded their data onto my computer, and re-buried them so that they keep recording temperature data all year long. It was interesting to see that it got pretty cold up on the roofs over the winter. Sometimes my probes were even encased in blocks of ice and continued to record 0 degrees Celsius (that’s 32 degrees Fahrenheit, or the freezing point of water) for many days and nights in a row. These green roof plants are a lot tougher than I am – no way I would have survived all winter up on the roofs!

 

The honey bees are buzzing on the green roofs again.

The honey bees are buzzing on the green roofs again.

In addition to the plants coming back to the roofs, some of the animals are back too. Although they are not part of my research, it’s still fun for me to see honey bees buzzing around their hives, geese nesting and little killdeer laying eggs on the roofs. Sometimes the green roofs where I work are not accessible to other people and I’m collecting data by myself so it’s nice to know that I’ve got a couple green roof buddies… even if they’re all of the flying variety.

 

 

A killdeer nest on a green roof. I can't wait to see the cute little baby killdeer!

A killdeer nest on a green roof. I can’t wait to see the cute little baby killdeer!

A mother goose keeps her eggs warm on one of the green roofs where I have my experiments.

A mother goose keeps her eggs warm on one of the green roofs where I have my experiments.

Dr. Kevin Rice visits from California and talks about his plant science research.

Dr. Kevin Rice visits from California and talks about his plant science research.

As the outdoor data collection season starts to ramp up, I’ve also been doing some indoor work, especially giving and organizing presentations. I had the privilege of helping to organize a visit from Dr. Kevin Rice, a plant scientist from the University of California in Davis. Along with some smaller meetings and social events, Dr. Rice gave a presentation about his research. It was really interesting to learn from a more experienced scientist, especially hearing about how he and his research team have been saving blue oak trees from severe drought in California.

"Design your own green roof" worksheets from my new activity book, Growing UP in the City, are ready to bring to a group of 5-8 graders.

“Design your own green roof” worksheets from my new activity book, Growing UP in the City, are ready to bring to a group of 5-8 graders.

I also gave four presentations myself this month, three of them in Pittsburgh through the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens as a current Botany in Action Fellow. During my trip to Pittsburgh, I talked to about 120 students at an all-girls school, a group of interested community members, and various Phipps staff members.

 

 

I bring a variety of resources and some of my research tools to my presentations so people can get a better visual of what I discuss in my presentations.

I bring a variety of resources and some of my research tools to my presentations so people can get a better visual of what I discuss in my presentations.

Back in the Chicago area, I gave a presentation to a local group of beekeepers who were interested in learning more about native pollinators and native plants. It was a pleasure to be able to talk about my research to such a diverse group of people and I look forward to doing a lot more of this type of science communication in the future.

I had a great time talking with a group of 5th-8th graders in Pittsburgh about my life as a botanist.

I had a great time talking with a group of 5th-8th graders in Pittsburgh about my life as a botanist.

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