Research update: August 2016

August is over and the summer field work is slowly coming to an end. Back-to-school for teachers and students means back-to-lab-and-writing for me.

Some of the plants in my green roof experiments are providing nectar and pollen for local bees. The bumble bees are especially loving the Allium cernuum (nodding onion).

Some of the plants in my green roof experiments are providing nectar and pollen for local bees. The bumble bees are especially loving the Allium cernuum (nodding onion).

I spent a lot of time this past month at my computer, looking at data I collected back in 2013 and writing about my results. I’ve been working on a written report or “manuscript” for a scientific journal. I finally improved things to the point where I felt pretty good about the way that everything looked and sounded so I submitted the manuscript to an urban ecology journal. Next, other scientists who have similar research interests will carefully review my work and let me know if they think I’ve missed something or performed any analyses incorrectly. When I receive their comments in about a month, I hope I will be able to make all the necessary changes and then re-submit my manuscript to be published. As soon as I submitted this first manuscript for review, I immediately started working on another manuscript looking at a different part of the data (the first manuscript is about how plant and insect diversity change on green roofs over time and the second manuscript is about how certain types of plants are better at surviving on green roofs than others). After I’ve spent more time on this second manuscript, I will submit it to a different journal and the whole review and re-writing process will be repeated. If you’re a scientist, there’s always more writing to be done.

As far as the outdoor work, I’ve finally finished the water-holding and evaporation experiment that I was running with my experimental green roof trays. I say “finally” because I had to add an extra trial due to some July rains and because this experiment is not one of my favorites to perform. It involves weighing the trays when they’re filled with soil, plants, and water, which can add up to about 40 pounds per tray. And there are 40 trays that each get measured 6 times in a 24-hour period. If you’re doing the math, that’s lifting trays 240 times. So yes, that experiment is FINALLY over and I’m pretty happy about it (so is my sore back). The next step will be to analyze the data and see what all those measurements mean. I’m excited to be able to use the results of that experiment to tell a story about which types of plants can absorb rainwater on green roofs.

It was strange to be fake-running my experiments on the green roofs as a film crew captured every move.

It was strange to be fake-running my experiments on the green roofs as a film crew captured every move.

One day this past month, I even got to “fake-run” this water-holding experiment as I was followed by a film crew. A local TV station is putting together a series on urban wildlife and asked me to participate by talking about biodiversity on green roofs and demonstrating some of my experimental techniques. It was fun to be hooked up to a microphone and followed around by a camera crew but they picked a VERY hot day for filming and it ended up being over 100 degrees (F) on the roofs! I think I’m going to look very sweaty in my first TV appearance but at least they captured the real-life work conditions that are present on green roofs. The episode will be in production for a while and I hope to put a link to the show on my blog this spring when it airs.

Every move was caught on camera as the film crew followed me on the green roofs. This is one of the few pictures where I'm not wiping away sweat in the 100+ degree heat.

Every move was caught on camera as the film crew followed me on the green roofs. This is one of the few pictures where I’m not wiping away sweat in the 100+ degree heat.

I think that really hot day with the TV crew will be the last one for a while. As the fall begins, I’ll get back to lab work, finish gathering the temperature data from all my research sites, start analyzing the data that I finished collecting this summer, and start writing more manuscripts for my dissertation. I’ll also be mentoring high school students through the PlantingScience program I participated in this summer and will begin the all-important search for a job. It should be an exciting time!

This fall, I'll be mentoring high school students through an online program. I got to learn all about the experiments they'll be doing at a hands-on summer workshop this past June.

This fall, I’ll be mentoring high school students through an online program. I got to learn all about the experiments they’ll be doing at a hands-on summer workshop this past June.

In the meantime, check out this article about how green roofs can help prevent urban flooding. Click here. Toward the end, there are even a few quotes from a familiar green roof ecologist! 😉 It’s fun to be able to be an expert on green roofs and biodiversity!

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