Research update: November/December 2016

The fall sun sets over the dormant plants on a green roof. See you next spring, plants!

The fall sun sets over the dormant plants on a green roof. See you next spring, plants!

In my previous post, I started by saying that I was gearing up for a winter of lab work, data analysis, and writing. In between holiday gatherings and celebrations (GO CUBS!), my work predictions for November and December were pretty accurate.

I remove the sealed top from my tray of samples after the DNA has been copied. It may not look like a lot of liquid in there, but there are thousands of copies of DNA!

I remove the sealed top from my tray of samples after the DNA has been copied. It may not look like a lot of liquid in there, but there are thousands of copies of DNA!

I drop oil on top of my samples in the little wells before running the final step of my paternity experiment. Then I cross my fingers that everything works this time.

I drop oil on top of my samples in the little wells before running the final step of my paternity experiment. Then I cross my fingers that everything works this time.

A renewed focus on lab work was my biggest priority over the past two months. I’ve been having a difficult time collecting all the data I need for this portion of my research due to a variety of factors including bad reagents (chemicals), low DNA quantities, low genetic diversity in my samples, faulty equipment, running out of supplies, dwindling research funding, possibly some unknown errors on my part and maybe even just some bad luck. (The lab manager also suggested that gremlins might be coming into the lab at night to mess with my experiments… at this point, is anything possible? Who knows!) So I’ve been fighting the good fight and filling in the missing data a little bit at a time. Sometimes it feels like I’m putting together a 1000 piece puzzle one piece at a time. It’s very arduous and I don’t know what the finished product will look like but I’m getting there and can’t wait to see the final results! In the meantime, I’ll keep on extracting more DNA, amplifying or making copies of the DNA, conducting the paternity tests, and looking for patterns of genetic diversity in the plant populations on my green roofs. You’ll no doubt hear more about these tasks during the next update.

I use this helpful pipette to transfer multiple samples at a time as I load the next yellow plate for DNA copying. Lots of the lab procedures are repeated over and over again.

I use this helpful pipette to transfer multiple samples at a time as I load the next yellow plate for DNA copying. Lots of the lab procedures are repeated over and over again.

This is what it looks like when you wait too long to collect your soil samples from your green roof experiment and have to do it when it's really cold outside!

This is what it looks like when you wait too long to collect your soil samples from your green roof experiment and have to do it when it’s really cold outside!

When I needed a mental break from the lab work, I mostly kept busy indoors. There was one chilly day that I spent on a green roof collecting some soil samples for a later analysis in the lab. I could have collected the soil back in October when temperatures were still balmy but this task slipped my mind and I ended up getting the job done on a very windy cold November day when the wind chill was about 20 degrees F (that’s about -7 degrees C). At least it wasn’t snowing yet! Other than that, I spent a lot of time analyzing the data that I’ve been collecting from the green roofs over the past few years and starting to interpret the patterns that I’m seeing. After having some initial data interpretations, I spent two weeks in December in a dissertation boot camp. This boot camp is a quiet place for doctoral candidates like me to really focus on writing about their research. It’s a great way to get some encouragement from peers to accomplish some writing before taking a little holiday break.

Another set of 96 samples is loaded up and ready to be processed in the DNA sequencing machine. This is the step in the paternity test where I determine each sample's genetic fingerprint... if it works correctly.

Another set of 96 samples is loaded up and ready to be processed in the DNA sequencing machine. This is the step in the paternity test where I determine each sample’s genetic fingerprint… if it works correctly.

As the year came to an end, so did my mentoring with the PlantingScience project. This program matches up thousands of students with plant science mentors from all around the country. As a liaison and scientist mentor for the project, I helped high school students and their teachers learn about “The Power of Sunlight,” or how plants perform photosynthesis. As a previous high school teacher myself, it was great to get to interact with this group of students and see how the teachers were using technology to introduce students to a diverse group of scientists. Who knows, maybe some of these students are now budding plant scientists!

Dried leaves rest among the last sprigs of green on top of a green roof at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Snow is coming soon!

Dried leaves rest among the last sprigs of green on top of a green roof at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Snow is coming soon!

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